Friday, April 14, 2017

Parent Camp Reflection

Recently our school hosted a brand new event. It was our version of a Parent Camp, which is an event modeled after EdCamp professional developments for educators. I introduced the idea to our staff as an opportunity to do something new, something different, something better than what we’ve always done.

Schools need to continuously evolve in regards to how we communicate and engage with our parent communities. This is something that I am passionate about. I know the value of people’s time. From a parent’s perspective, especially, I understand. As a result, when the parents of our students are giving us their time, it should be our obligation to find ways to make that time as meaningful as possible.

Our intention was to have different conversations with our parent community once we had them within our school walls. We didn't want to talk at them; we wanted to talk with them. We didn’t want a monologue; we wanted a dialogue. We didn't want everyone to hear the exact same thing because not everyone needs and/or wants to hear the exact same thing. We wanted to differentiate for our parents like we know we need to differentiate for our teachers and differentiate for our students.

We’re a school of over 500 students. Assuming that the majority of our students have two parents, that is approximately 1,000 parents within our school community. Prior to our event, I’d thought about what number I’d be pleased with in regards to attendance. 150 parents. That was my goal.  A head count during the evening totaled 28 parents. I was dejected. At the conclusion of the evening, I was visibly dejected.

I know better. Rarely do I wear my emotions on my sleeves. But I’m human. I slipped-up. It took me a good night’s sleep and a multi-mile run in the morning, but within ten-hours I had re-embraced the positive attitude that I preach. Choose your attitude. My bad.

I'm a leader, and if I want staff and students to exhibit a positive attitude and a growth mindset then I need to model what I expect. Always. To F.A.I.L. is simply the First Attempt in Learning. Failure is a requirement when we’re talking about the process of learning. It’s NOT a reason to be ashamed.

During the Parent Camp, the conversations that I had with parents were amazing! Upon further reflection, I realize that if our Parent Camp was beneficial for one parent (and/or teacher) then it was a success. We solicited feedback from those that attended (and those that did not attend) our Parent Camp. Our feedback was positive. We received some really good ideas about the advertising, content, and timing of any future Parent Camp that we’ll host.

We’re going to try again. The positive impact that this event has the potential to produce is too great. It wouldn’t be fair to throw in the towel after just our first attempt.

“Try something new. It's OKAY to fail.” Oskar Cymerman via Educators Lead Podcast


  1. Eric, we too tried a parentcamp two years ago for the same reasons but unfortunately we had no one show up. It could have been the advertising and promotion of the event combined with the vagueness of the term parentcamp. I'm curious what feedback did you receive from those that attended? And what lessons did you learn? Parentcamp has great potential to foster and strengthen parent and school relationship.

  2. Our turnout at Parent Partnership Night has been less than what we'd like to see as well. If we are able to make one connection or strengthen one relationship then we've accomplished what we set out to do. This can be hard to remember in the moment. Thanks for sharing your story, Eric!